Discourse on Method…

…of constructing a hexagon quilt without going nuts. Sorry folks (those of you who hoped to find some info on Descartes’ ‘I think, therefore I am’), though this is philosophy, it is of the different kind!DSCN5079 I re- interpret it as ‘I stitch, therefore I have a quilt’ or something…

As I mentioned in the last post, I took pieces for ‘The Quilt’ on our camping holiday and completed another 10 (!!!) big flowers with white borders, each comprising 19 hexagons. Let’s have a look at the ‘kit’ first: Here you have a standard flat plastic container containing everything one needs.

  • Templates made from thin cardboard – I actually photocopy the templates directly on paper that is slightly more heavy than ordinary printing paper, so ‘all I have to do’ is cut the shapes (but even that is a huge amount of work with so small hexagons, as you can imagine)
  • pre- cut fabric pieces of fabric. There are three kinds: green, shades of cream and white and colors (grouped in the flower patterns)
  • some fabric covered templates
  • thread: cotton sewing thread for covering the card templates and silk thread for sewing the covered shapes together
  • needles: two kinds corresponding to the treads
  • thimble, scissorsDSCN5097

Well, as The Quilt grows, it will get more and more clumsy to add to it. So this will be The Method: I shall be adding rows of flowers at a time. This enables me to keep working on individual flowers without thinking about the overall design:

  • cover hexagon shapes for flowers, just stitch stitch stitch…
  • cover shapes en masse in cream and white, just stitch stitch st…
  • cover plenty of random green hexagons, just st st st…
  • assemble individual flowers until I have a lot, just st st s…
  • add to some of the flowers a white/ cream row of hexagons, just st s s…
  • add to the big flowers with a white circle of hexagons two green hexagons at one side, just sss…
  • add to the little flowers two green hexagons at opposing sides, jsss

Uh, the last two instructions sound like rocket science, but if you just look at the last picture in this post, it will all come clear.

And then you have to think!

DSCN5100DSCN5096It pays off to have more flowers that you need for the next row along the quilt, so you can choose from many flowers until you are really happy with the overall color combination in the quilt!

So you try out the best color arrangement possible as you add a new row to the quilt. To be precise, you are actually adding two rows at a time. The first row is a row of small flowers that have two green hexagons added on each side. Sew them on the quilt edge. And then you sew all the big white flowers together, they will be connected with two green hexagons in between. Finally you sew that long row of connected big white flowers to the edge of the quilt.DSCN5087 Voila. And then you pack this project away again… because it is time consuming and because there are more pressing things to do in life. But it is wonderful to see it grow, slowly but surely.
There is a fellow blogger across the Pacific who is working steadily on her hexagons… and we are both exited to follow each others progress – this is the beauty of blogging!

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3 thoughts on “Discourse on Method…

  1. This quilt is stitching up beeeauutifully! I wish I had used silk thread from the start with mine, but I started with hand quilting thread & I’m scared to change part way thru. Maybe the next one 🙂
    I am also much lazier than you…I buy paper templates (though I do reuse them several times) and I also just cut my fabric into squares (2.5 inch squares are just right for 1 inch-side hexagons – which is handy for using up charm packs too!)
    Loved reading your discourse on method!

  2. Thanks for all that praise and ‘handy hints’! I am a bit of a goose and have no idea what is available in craft shops… I always make life a lot harder than it has to be – until somebody like yourself points that out to me! It is really encouraging that I know you are working away on your quilt over there. Can you post a picture of the original quilt that inspired you, the picture with the star? I would so love to see it!

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